Technology devices (Hsiche Wang, Gong, & Houn-Gee, 2017)

Technology
and Aging: Assisting Independence in the Home

Modern
technology is believed by many healthcare workers to have a significant impact
in assisting the aging population with several high level risk factors
(Kenisan, 2016). These factors include, but are not limited to disease
management, sensory and mobility impairments, falls, functional and cognitive
decline, and depression (Czaja, 2015).

In
one study completed by the University of Burgos (Casado-Muñoz, Lezcano, &
Rodríguez-Conde, 2015) from 2004 to 2012 of 419 people ages 55 to 94, there was
a 37.9% average increase in the use of computers. Another study created by
Global Ageing (Llorente-Barroso, Viñarás-Abad, & Sánchez-Valle, 2015) held
three discussion groups of five to six people aged 56 to 81 to find out how
useful the Internet is for the elderly and the potential the Internet has for
active aging.

This
paper discusses several aspects that will aid the elderly patient in
maintaining their independence. According to Huber and Watson (2014) there are
many possibilities that may inhibit the use of technological advances with the
elderly population.  Larger font sizes
and screens on computers and cellular devices (Hsiche Wang, Gong, &
Houn-Gee, 2017) aid older adults with some of the barriers that often occur
with using these devices.  Research by
Johnson and Parnell (2017) examines advances in technology used in the
community as well, granting the older patient more autonomy in their home.

PICO Question

For
aging adults wanting to maintain their independence, does the use of assistive
technology allow them to remain in their homes longer than when technology is
not being used? 

Literature Search

The terms technology
and aging were entered into the
EBSCO search engine and yielded 4,560 relevant articles.  The research was limited to peer-reviewed,
scholarly journals. Publication dates ranged from 2015 to the present.